Salt is not something you want to get too much of in the world of humans. Some say that a human should get no more than 2,000mg of Salt per day.

In the world of dogs, however, it’s a different story!

Salt can be perfect for your dog in moderation. For one thing, Salt often has minerals and nutrients added back into it after being processed. It can also add flavour to kibble and canned foods while helping to give treats a satisfying crunch that will encourage your furry friend to eat slower.

 However, if you have been feeding your dog table scraps or dog foods with a lot of Salt, you need to know the dangers of feeding your pup too much Salt. Table scraps and, especially, added Salt can be dangerous for dogs, as excess salt intake causes dehydration and bloating in dogs. It also leads to canine problems like sodium ion poisoning, water toxicity, electrolyte imbalances, high blood pressure, and kidney damage.

So how much Salt is okay for dogs? To answer this simple question, here are some things you should know about table salts: Salt is Sodium Chloride. Table Salt = 40% sodium chloride + 60 % chemicals that are used in its processing, which are not good for your dog’s health. It contains anti-caking agents, which are not healthy for your best friend. Table salt is fortified with iodine, calcium silicate, aluminum hydroxide, dextrose, and anhydrous dextrose. These are just some of the chemicals added to table salt, with many more in the list. Before you feed your pup something salty like table scraps or canned food, remember this: Salt Can Kill Dogs! 

Save Your Dog from Sodium Iodide Poisoning and Bloating

Dogs can tolerate small amounts of Salt in their diets, but adding table salt to pet food contributes to the unhealthy rise in blood pressure that leads to heart failure and other serious health problems in dogs. According to Veterinary Partner, ‘sodium ion poisoning and bloating’ are two common side effects of too much salt intake for dogs. These chemicals aren’t healthy for your best friend.

Special Case for Acute Salt Poisoning in Dogs

Salt Poisoning in dogs is one of the most common types of poisoning. Salt Poisoning occurs when a dog overtakes Salt in a short period. Dogs are more sensitive to Salt than humans are because they can’t efficiently eliminate it through their kidneys, so they have far less tolerance for it. It typically doesn’t take much sodium (from either food or table scraps) to cause salt poisoning problems like ingestion and intoxication in dogs. Symptoms of Salt Poisoning usually show up within 30 minutes after your dog has gobbled down his meal; sometimes, symptoms might not occur for an hour or even several hours later. If you think your pup has ingested too much sodium, look for nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, hypersalivation, elevated temperature, and rapid breathing.

Salt Poisoning Treatment

Salt Poisoning Treatment is a medical emergency that requires hospitalization and IV fluids for several days, possibly weeks. Suppose your dog shows signs of salt poisoning (vomiting, diarrhea), in that case, you should call vet immediately and get him to a clinic for treatment because these symptoms can cause life-threatening conditions like dehydration and shock if not treated promptly.

Salt is neither good nor bad for dogs. But too much can cause problems like dehydration and sodium ion poisoning in dogs (which leads to bloating). So watch the salt intake!

 

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